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So many nights I just dream of the ocean...
Aug 29 '14

ahndja:

neybooto:

the best feeling in the world is when your teacher says “these essays/papers sucked” and getting yours back with a “nice work!” and a lil smiley bc success is so much sweeter when you know others have failed 

image

HOLY SHIT I MIGHT BE A SLYTHERIN

(Source: neyruto)

Aug 28 '14
Aug 28 '14
Aug 26 '14

Beyoncé on set for Drunk In Love music video

(Source: miniyo)

Aug 26 '14
Aug 26 '14
bethgittings:

When you realize it’s only Tuesday

bethgittings:

When you realize it’s only Tuesday

Aug 25 '14

kuboart:

I love this scene so much and I feel like I was never able to fully appreciate just how much it was trying to convey until fairly recently. I don’t know why it never dawned on me sooner but I always wanted to write up a small appreciation post about my thoughts on it. 

Anyway, this scene becomes so beautiful when you really consider the parallels that are going on here between Hammond and the park. Hammond is so dedicated to his dream and his vision that he would do anything to preserve what’s left of it at this point just so he wouldn’t have to face the the pain of letting go of it. And this is so perfectly and beautifully illustrated as he sits at the table with Ellie, sharing his fondest thoughts & memories with her all while trying to keep the parks ice cream from going to waste..

Hammond is being portrayed like a child with too much ice cream.

Just like a child, his visions of the fantastic and for what could be override the reality of what’s going on and the responsibility he must take. 

And just like the ice cream, the park is too much of a good thing and there’s far too much of it melting away for him to be able to save..

All the thanks to Richard Attenborough for giving this character the depth he was always meant to have. He’ll be dearly missed <3

Aug 24 '14

R.I.P. Richard Attenborough (1923-2014)

Aug 23 '14
"My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané."
Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)
Aug 22 '14
The Beatles - Across The Universe

Nothing’s gonna change my world

Aug 22 '14
Aug 22 '14
"

‘Fat’ is usually the first insult a girl throws at another girl when she wants to hurt her.

I mean, is ‘fat’ really the worst thing a human being can be? Is ‘fat’ worse than ‘vindictive’, ‘jealous’, ‘shallow’, ‘vain’, ‘boring’ or ‘cruel’? Not to me; but then, you might retort, what do I know about the pressure to be skinny? I’m not in the business of being judged on my looks, what with being a writer and earning my living by using my brain…

I went to the British Book Awards that evening. After the award ceremony I bumped into a woman I hadn’t seen for nearly three years. The first thing she said to me? ‘You’ve lost a lot of weight since the last time I saw you!’

‘Well,’ I said, slightly nonplussed, ‘the last time you saw me I’d just had a baby.’

What I felt like saying was, ‘I’ve produced my third child and my sixth novel since I last saw you. Aren’t either of those things more important, more interesting, than my size?’ But no – my waist looked smaller! Forget the kid and the book: finally, something to celebrate!

I’ve got two daughters who will have to make their way in this skinny-obsessed world, and it worries me, because I don’t want them to be empty-headed, self-obsessed, emaciated clones; I’d rather they were independent, interesting, idealistic, kind, opinionated, original, funny – a thousand things, before ‘thin’. And frankly, I’d rather they didn’t give a gust of stinking chihuahua flatulence whether the woman standing next to them has fleshier knees than they do. Let my girls be Hermiones, rather than Pansy Parkinsons.

"

J.K. Rowling  

image

(via likejameslovedlily)

this is personally in my list of things you must reblog when you see it

(via potternyc)

Love this women.

(via kristenpurgeswords)

"gust of stinking chihuahua flatulence" As if my day didn’t already include a bunch of references to things produced by the brain of j.k. rowling

(via chocolateandcardio)

Aug 22 '14
Aug 22 '14
Aug 22 '14
terra-mater:

Bermuda triangle

For over forty years, the Bermuda Triangle has been popularly known for supposedly paranormal disappearances of boats and aircraft. This imaginary triangle, also known as “Devil’s Triangle,” has its three points at Miami, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda. Actually, despite several factors which should contribute to higher rates of accidents in the region, the Bermuda Triangle has been found to be no more statistically dangerous than other areas of the open ocean.
The popular legend of the Bermuda Triangle began with a 1964 article in the magazine Argosy that described and named the Triangle. Further articles and reports in such magazines as National Geographic and Playboy merely repeated the legend without additional research. Many of the disappearances discussed in these articles and others did not even occur in the area of the Triangle.
The 1945 disappearance of five military airplanes and a rescue plane was the primary focus of the legend. In December of that year, Flight 19 set out on a training mission from Florida with a leader who wasn’t feeling well, an underexperienced crew, a lack of navigation equipment, a limited supply of fuel, and rough seas below. Though the loss of Flight 19 may have initially seemed mysterious, the cause of its failure is well documented today.
There are a few real hazards in the area of the Bermuda Triangle that contribute to the accidents that occur in the wide swath of sea. The first is the lack of magnetic declination near 80° west (just off the coast of Miami). This agonic line is one of two points on the earth’s surface where compasses point directly to the North Pole, versus to the Magnetic North Pole elsewhere on the planet. The change in declination can make compass navigation difficult.
Inexperienced pleasure boaters and aviators are common in the area of the triangle and the U.S. Coast Guard receives many distress calls from stranded seamen. They travel too far from the coast and often have an insufficient supply of fuel or knowledge of the swiftly moving Gulf Stream current.
Overall, the mystery surrounding the Bermuda Triangle is not much of a mystery at all but has simply been the result of an overemphasis on the accidents which have occurred in the area.

terra-mater:

Bermuda triangle

For over forty years, the Bermuda Triangle has been popularly known for supposedly paranormal disappearances of boats and aircraft. This imaginary triangle, also known as “Devil’s Triangle,” has its three points at MiamiPuerto Rico, and Bermuda. Actually, despite several factors which should contribute to higher rates of accidents in the region, the Bermuda Triangle has been found to be no more statistically dangerous than other areas of the open ocean.

The popular legend of the Bermuda Triangle began with a 1964 article in the magazine Argosy that described and named the Triangle. Further articles and reports in such magazines as National Geographic and Playboy merely repeated the legend without additional research. Many of the disappearances discussed in these articles and others did not even occur in the area of the Triangle.

The 1945 disappearance of five military airplanes and a rescue plane was the primary focus of the legend. In December of that year, Flight 19 set out on a training mission from Florida with a leader who wasn’t feeling well, an underexperienced crew, a lack of navigation equipment, a limited supply of fuel, and rough seas below. Though the loss of Flight 19 may have initially seemed mysterious, the cause of its failure is well documented today.

There are a few real hazards in the area of the Bermuda Triangle that contribute to the accidents that occur in the wide swath of sea. The first is the lack of magnetic declination near 80° west (just off the coast of Miami). This agonic line is one of two points on the earth’s surface where compasses point directly to the North Pole, versus to the Magnetic North Pole elsewhere on the planet. The change in declination can make compass navigation difficult.

Inexperienced pleasure boaters and aviators are common in the area of the triangle and the U.S. Coast Guard receives many distress calls from stranded seamen. They travel too far from the coast and often have an insufficient supply of fuel or knowledge of the swiftly moving Gulf Stream current.

Overall, the mystery surrounding the Bermuda Triangle is not much of a mystery at all but has simply been the result of an overemphasis on the accidents which have occurred in the area.

(Source: geography.about.com)